TOLL FREE: 1.800.831.3309

NuSe

More Views

NuSe
$35.95

Availability: In stock

Our Original Vitamin E & Selenium Product

* Required Fields

$35.95
Description

Details

Vitamin E and Selenium (Se) are most often supplemented in combination because research has indicated a strong synergistic effect between these two nutritional components. 

Supplementing Vitamin E and Selenium is easy with HorseTech Equine NuSe. Each one (1) ounce feeding will provide 1 mg of selenium from sodium selenite along with a full 1,100 IU of premium quality Vitamin E (a full 10% more than many E/Se products!). 

Product Note: Selenium yeast has been approved for use in Equine Supplements. HorseTech now offers the combination of Selenium Yeast (an organic source of selenium with improved bio-availability) and Natural Vitamin E in a new product called Selen AT. To read more about Selen AT, click here!

Directions for Use

Feed at the rate of one ounce per day (28.4 grams) to provide 1.0 mg of Selenium (Se) and 1,100 IU of Vitamin E. One level 60cc scoop will provide approximately one (1) ounce (28.4 grams).

Do not exceed maximum selenium allowances as established by FDA.

For Equine Use Only. Use as a source of Selenium (Se) and Vitamin E in complete equine diets.

Ingredients

Yeast Culture, Vitamin E Supplement, Sodium Selenite, Natural and Artificial Flavoring,  Calcium Carbonate, Mineral Oil

Labeling, Warnings, Cautions, & Misc.

Selenium Toxicity:

Note that some areas may have naturally high selenium content in soils.  The result is enhanced selenium levels in the grasses and forages produced on those soils.  Always consult with your local veterinarian prior to using any selenium supplement.

Acute selenium toxicity--blind staggers--is characterized by apparent blindness, head pressing, perspiration, abdominal pain, colic, diarrhea, increased heart and respiration rates, and lethargy (Rosenfeld and Beath, 1964).

Chronic selenium toxicity-alkali disease-is characterized by alopecia, especially about the mane and tail, as well as cracking of the hooves around the coronary band (Rosenfeld and Beath, 1964; Traub-Dargatz and Hamar, 1986).

Click here to view current label

Reviews